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20130212
20130212
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
it here. because she knew how to use her computer and resources. i am with you. i need more lessons, obviously. i had the phone but not the knowledge. we're going to do something about that in my household. we're also doing something about living that far away from the center of everything, which is right here in the city. if you want to buy a house in the country would to a half acres, i have got one for you. it is is the morning as we all evolves, and as my husband and i get closer to 80, both of us have retired two times already. we're now getting ready for a third got around to remember, you could do as many as you like, too, because you're the only one that can say i am tired of doing that and i do not want to do it anymore. that is right. we have some people with real knowledge and not chitchat to come up and tell us how we can age at the same time that we are gaining insight, knowledge, and exposure to a vast universe of information and opportunity. so we are going to start with derek lamb, an aging service program specialist for the newly reorganized administration for commu
is that if you look at the next ten years, most of it will be caused by things we care about. >> all of us are invested in this democracy. we are to the going to have parts of our community succeed and parts fail. if government fails, we all fail. >> we don't trust government. but we need government. and government is us, when you come right down to it. those folks in washington weren't landed there from mars. they were elected by us. >> it's a complex problem. people want quick answersment but the fact is that there aren't quick answers. >> these aren't things that can be fixed in election cycle. and the question is do we have the political leadership that is willing to invest that way. >> rational thinking leads to one thing, conclusions. and conclusions are not going to solve the debt problem. emotions on the other hand leads to another thing, action. okay. and we need to take action about the debt in the u.s. we need to change. >> we're going to pass on to our kids a less prosperous nation where they will have a lower standard of living, a massive debt they can't afford to pay off and
common use. of course, all guns are dangerous or they would be useless. but a gun that can spray bullets without being reloaded is more dangerous. and the third criterion was how vital it is to self-defense. now, none of those things can be answered in a kind of easy, black and white way, because in a sense the more dangerous a gun is the more useful it also is for self-defense. >> that's a good point. i guess that's what i'm trying to tell the public. could you put up our chart up -- about different guns? i think we all agree that any weapon, one bullet in the hands of a mentally unstable person is one too many, do you agree with that concept? any gun should be denied someone who's mentally unstable? >> yeah. >> i do. >> i think everybody would. and we don't want felons because that's already the existing law. now, a circumstance you've described, the circumstance you found yourself in. there is a case in atlanta recently, dr. tribe are of a lady -- of a lady who was defending her home against a home invader. she was home with twin daughters. she ran up to the closet. she was on the pho
they're using them as animal beds, like dog beds and everything. they're just really hot. and this one is really nice because of the exotic skin. i was ecstatic with the price i got this evening. quinn: sold, $325. john: an early carpenter's toolbox with all the tools. early 1900s, look at the auger bits. and they're works of art themselves, they're fabulous. everything in this. somebody has either lovingly cleaned it up or it's been kept this way. that's fabulous. is this the way you found it? kurt sanftleben: it is, it is. the guy who had this, he took exceptional care of his tools. i got this at a country auction about six months ago. i didn't clean anything. i wiped off the box. wow, a man who takes care of his tools. so how many pieces total are in this? about 24, 25. 24, 25 pieces. not counting the individual pieces. i think most of the stuff dates from the early 1900s to 1920s, '30s. yeah, i figured 1900, 1920. the saws are about 1930. what do i have on it? you've got eight bills on it. i've got $800 on it? i have a lot of people want to buy tools out of it. oh, no
as soon as they are released. plus, in just a few minutes, rimm i don't imaginers joining us in studio. he expects the to have not one, not two, but a few lost decades, but that doesn't mean you have to lose. he'll tell us where investors need to be putting their money right now. david: by the way, his book is "street smarts," and he's one of the smartest guys on the street. we're going to be heading to the white house for tonight's big state of the union address, plus steve forbes in studio telling us what he thinks president obama needs to say and do to grow our economy. liz: but first, today's data download. the dow and the s&p 500 hitting new five-year highs today with the dow pushing back above the 14,000 mark. the nasdaq, though, as we showed you ending the trading day in the red. financials and telecom were today's top performing sectors while technology, consumer staples and health care were the ones that kind of lagged behind. did you see corn? corn falling for an eighth session in a row on reports that output is expected to climb in south america. that supply goes up, corn hits a
to bement and i couldn't put my finger on what that uncertainty is. and that lead us into a deep dive not numbers. that's who we are. we are a numbers company, very data oriented. and we did a deep dive. and the numbers are stunning. >> rose: we conclude with adam posen, president of the peterson institute. >> for those there are sort of two things, the real versus the monetary, the you have to suffer for your sins versus you have to stop the panic. those are in the sense would be the two schools. >> rose: you're in favor of stopping the panic. >> absolutely. >> rose: and not suffering for your sins to you. >> it to the a morality play f you want to do a morality play we can do lots of things like putting bankers in jails and thing like that but not at the macro level no one is being recorded rdz but most people understand we need entitlement reform and it ought to be on the table. >> absolutely. >> rose: mish phenomenon-- fishman and pos enwhen we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> from our studios in
's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile program constitutes a threat to u.s. national securityty and to international peace and security. ♪or north korea has been warning for weeks it was about to test its l. nuclear arsenal opinion on tuesday morning it exploded a in bomb in a facility one kilometerunderground underground, near the same same location location of its nuclear test in 2006 and 2009. >> there is concern that they could come could come up with a delivery system for their nuclear weapon weapons.eporter: l >> reporter: last week the u.s. .s. and south korea navies launched military drills in the region as a show of force.fo north korea's test demonstrates ificant a significant split from its main patron china. recently beijing warned leader ns kim jong-un against any weapons tests. >> they've said publicly there rea. would be real consequences for north korea. what those consequences are we have have to see but i suspect it's going to be more than an angry of letter. >> reporter: china is one of the few countries supporting north could respond korea's f
, for every 12, 2013. president obama traveled -- will travel down pennsylvania avenue tonight to the u.s. capitol building to deliver the first state of the union address of his second term at 9:00 eastern. c-span coverage begins at 8:00 tonight. we would like to hear from you this morning. how much reducing state of the union addresses matter? here are the numbers to call -- be it can also find us online. john the conversation -- -- join the conversation. the front page of "politico's website -- we will talk about lobbying later on this morning. first, let's look at the five stings it says to watch the president obama address tonight. , do you think state of the union addresses matter? that's our question for you. on facebook we have a poll where you can weigh in. the washington post says the impact of annual addresses does not intend to be long-lasting. what do you stinkpot? jim in therapy -- what do you think? jim in fairfax station. caller: no, they don't matter. it's an opportunity to look at what is said in a state of the union and move forward a year after it and assess what was p
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)